9.4cm Unusually Coloured Polished Ammonite Cross-Section Fossil from Madagascar <br>(110 million years)<br>
9.4cm Unusually Coloured Polished Ammonite Cross-Section Fossil from Madagascar <br>(110 million years)<br>
9.4cm Unusually Coloured Polished Ammonite Cross-Section Fossil from Madagascar <br>(110 million years)<br>

9.4cm Unusually Coloured Polished Ammonite Cross-Section Fossil from Madagascar
(110 million years)

Product code: 166699-l
Pictured specimen is the actual one you will receive
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SPECIES
Phylloceras

AGE
110 million years (Cretaceous - Albian Stage)

LOCATION
Ambatolafia, Mahajanga Province, Madagascar

SIZE
9.4cm wide, cross-section

*NOTE: THIS FOSSIL COMES WITH A GIFT BOX, A FLOATING FRAME AND ENGRAVED BASE, A SPECIES INFORMATION CARD, AND AN INTERNATIONAL AUTHENTICITY CERTIFICATE.

DESCRIPTION

Here is a beautiful, unusually coloured, cut and polished ammonite (Cleoniceras) fossil from Madagascar. These ammonites are Cretaceous in age, approximately 110 million years old.

This is a different species than most other ammonites (which are Cleonoceras); we believe this may be Phylloceras.

The dark, black/orange coloration is quite unusual as the majority of these ammonites are brown/yellow. These have been collected from a different location and the difference in coloration would be due to changes to the rock within the earth after the ammonite was fossilized, probably due to the addition of Manganese. You'll notice some of the attached matrix on the back side is a deep orange color instead of the typical grey from the other localities further hinting at these changes.

This highly polished, exotic ammonite makes a superb display piece with tremendous historical appeal.

Ammonites were sea creatures (more specifically, molluscs) that look similar to today's squid and octopus. They had eyes, spiral shells and tenticles. The oldest ammonite fossils that we have are 240 million years old. The most recent ones are 65 million years old, suggesting that this was the period when they became extinct. Their fossils were found in many different countries. Ammonites are known for their beauty; their suture points create beautiful patterns. Ammonite females are believed to be larger than the males. It is also thought that ammonites had ten arms to grasp small prey such as fish. The largest ammonites that were ever found measure around 180cm.

Ammonites had a strong existence; they survived most major extinction events. With every extinction event, there were some ammonite species that came extinct and those that survived. The last ammonites got extinct in the same extinction event as the dinosaurs, approximately 65 million years ago. Some of the ammonite fossils have been found with triangular holes in them, believed that these were puncture holes created by mosasaurs (large marine reptiles that existed at that time).

History indicates that humans have always been fascinated by ammonites. In our times, the different species of ammonites that are found in the rocks, were and still are, a key to biostratigraphy (the study of different layers of rock and their age estimation). And definitely they are still much appreciated for their spectacular and beautiful features.